Day 24: Sometimes You Need A Teacher

This past while, I’ve been finishing my Pro Tools 10 Essential Training course on Lynda.com and I found that I learned how to troubleshoot my sessions better.

What Is Troubleshooting

Troubleshooting is a form of problem solving, often applied to repair failed products or processes. It is a logical, systematic search for the source of a problem so that it can be solved, and so the product or process can be made operational again.” – Wikipedia (Because I love Wikipedia)

What I Learned

Pro Tools handles your computers RAM in a way I never really knew about. Knowing about it will now help me be able to streamline my computers processing power in different types of recording sessions. One thing I never knew about was how the undo commands in Pro Tools were stored in your RAM. (But I guess all undo commands in any program are stored in your RAM, so I learned something new all together) You can have a max of 32 undos stored, but each one thats being stored takes memory away from other memory intensive tasks.

For some studios, this really is a non-issue because of how powerful their systems are, but for those editing on the fly with their laptop, it makes a difference wether or not you have 16 undo commands stored, or 32. If you have a 64+ track session that you need to edit, which has multiple plugins on each track, trimming down the amount of saved undo commands will help leave RAM open for those plugins. Awesome! Now you’re system will most likely not freeze. I think that’s pretty cool.

Sometimes You Need A Teacher

Sometimes there are things that you just can’t learn through trial and error. You could setup some mic’s, hit record, listen to the audio, and improve your mic placement based off of purely trial and error, but sometimes hard data can only be taught through another person. The “don’t do’s” are a lot easier to learn from trial and error, then the “how to’s”. I would have never found out that I could save some of my RAM in Pro Tools until someone actually told me. In this case, it was David Franz who was teaching the course. Sure, I could have clicked a button by accident, done a few things here or there by chance, and then my sessions are working flawlessly. But that really wouldn’t teach me anything. I’d be great at knowing what not to do, but I wouldn’t be able to troubleshoot for the life of me when it all falls apart.

Stay Humble, Keep Listening

The moment you stop listening, is the moment you stop learning. The moment you stop learning, is the moment you stop leading. Stay humble, and listen to those around you. Whether what they’re saying is something you already know or not. If you don’t keep listening, you’ll never make it to the point when you’re hearing about something new.

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